Andrew C. G. Porter

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Topoisomerase II removes supercoils and cate-nanes generated during DNA metabolic processes such as transcription and replication. Vertebrate cells express two genetically distinct isoforms (a and b) with similar structures and biochemical activities but different biological roles. Topoisomerase IIa is essential for cell proliferation, whereas topoisomerase(More)
Cloned human telomeric DNA can integrate into mammalian chromosomes and seed the formation of new telomeres. This process occurs efficiently in three established human cell lines and in a mouse embryonic stem cell line. The newly seeded telomeres appear to be healed by telomerase. The seeding of new telomeres by cloned telomeric DNA is either undetectable(More)
Homologous recombination (HR) is used in vertebrate somatic cells for essential, RAD51-dependent, repair of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs), but inappropriate HR can cause genome instability. A transcriptional transactivation-independent role for p53 in suppressing HR has been established, but is not detected in all HR assays. To address the basis of such(More)
We describe gene targeting experiments involving a human cell line (RAN10) containing, in addition to its endogenous alleles, two ectopic alleles of the interferon-inducible gene 6-16. The frequency of gene targeting at one of the ectopic 6-16 alleles (H3.7) was 34-fold greater than the combined frequency of gene targeting involving endogenous 6-16 alleles(More)
Topoisomerase II removes supercoils and cate-nanes generated during DNA metabolic processes such as transcription and replication. Vertebrate cells express two genetically distinct isoforms (a and b) with similar structures and biochemical activities but different biological roles. Topoisomerase IIa is essential for cell proliferation, whereas topoisomerase(More)
Type II DNA topoisomerases catalyse DNA double-strand cleavage, passage and re-ligation to effect topological changes. There is considerable interest in elucidating topoisomerase II roles, particularly as these proteins are targets for anti-cancer drugs. Here we uncover a role for topoisomerase IIα in RNA polymerase I-directed ribosomal RNA gene(More)
DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are toxic lesions, which if improperly repaired can result in cell death or genomic instability. DSB repair is usually facilitated by the classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ), or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. However, a mutagenic alternative NHEJ pathway, microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), can also(More)
Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) controls cell proliferation and is inhibited by promising anticancer agents, but its mode of action and the consequences of its inhibition are incompletely understood. Cdk1 promotes S- and M-phases during the cell-cycle but also suppresses endoreduplication, which is associated with polyploidy and genome instability. The(More)
Understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal double-strand break repair (DSBR) provides insight into genome instability, oncogenesis and genome engineering, including disease gene correction. Research into DSBR exploits rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave exogenous reporter constructs integrated into the genome. Multiple reporter constructs have been(More)
As proliferating cells transit from interphase into M-phase, chromatin undergoes extensive reorganization, and topoisomerase (topo) IIα, the major isoform of this enzyme present in cycling vertebrate cells, plays a key role in this process. In this study, a human cell line conditional null mutant for topo IIα and a derivative expressing an auxin-inducible(More)