Andrew B. Goryachev

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Complex biochemical networks can be understood by identifying their principal regulatory motifs and mode of action. We model the early phase of budding yeast cellular polarization and show that the biochemical processes in the presumptive bud site comprise a Turing-type mechanism. The roles of the prototypical activator and substrate are played by GTPase(More)
For budding yeast to ensure formation of only one bud, cells must polarize toward one, and only one, site. Polarity establishment involves the Rho family GTPase Cdc42, which concentrates at polarization sites via a positive feedback loop. To assess whether singularity is linked to the specific Cdc42 feedback loop, we disabled the yeast cell's endogenous(More)
Virus infection induces an antiviral response that is predominantly associated with the synthesis and secretion of soluble interferon. Here, we report that herpes simplex virus type 1 virions induce an interferon-independent antiviral state in human embryonic lung cells that prevents plaquing of a variety of viruses. Microarray analysis of 19,000 human(More)
Understanding the relationship between the structural organization of intracellular decision networks and the observable phenotypes they control is one of the exigent problems of modern systems biology. Here we perform a systems analysis of a prototypic quorum sensing network whose operation allows bacterial populations to activate certain patterns of gene(More)
Asymmetric cell division plays a crucial role in cell differentiation, unequal replicative senescence, and stem cell maintenance. In budding yeast, the identities of mother and daughter cells begin to diverge at bud emergence when distinct plasma-membrane domains are formed and separated by a septin ring. However, the mechanisms underlying this(More)
Formation of multiprotein complexes on cellular membranes is critically dependent on the cyclic activation of small GTPases. FRAP-based analyses demonstrate that within protein complexes, some small GTPases cycle nearly three orders of magnitude faster than they would spontaneously cycle in vitro. At the same time, experiments report concomitant excess of(More)
The nuclear envelope contains >100 transmembrane proteins that continuously exchange with the endoplasmic reticulum and move within the nuclear membranes. To better understand the organization and dynamics of this system, we compared the trafficking of 15 integral nuclear envelope proteins using FRAP. A surprising 30-fold range of mobilities was observed.(More)
Anillin is a scaffolding protein that organizes and stabilizes actomyosin contractile rings and was previously thought to function primarily in cytokinesis [1-10]. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system to examine Anillin's role in the intact vertebrate epithelium, we find that a population of Anillin surprisingly localizes to epithelial cell-cell(More)
Many systems regulating cell polarity involve stable landmarks defined by internal cues. In the rod-shaped fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, microtubules regulate polarized vegetative growth via a landmark involving the protein Tea1. Tea1 is delivered to cell tips as packets of molecules associated with growing microtubule ends and anchored at the(More)
The formation of interconnected hyphal networks is central to the organisation and functioning of the filamentous fungal colony. It is brought about by the fusion of specialised hyphae during colony initiation and mature colony development. These hyphae are normally genetically identical, and hence this process is termed hyphal self-fusion. The conidial(More)