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People seem to think that a unit of some entity (with certain constraints) is the appropriate and optimal amount. We refer to this heuristic as unit bias. We illustrate unit bias by demonstrating large effects of unit segmentation, a form of portion control, on food intake. Thus, people choose, and presumably eat, much greater weights of Tootsie Rolls and(More)
College students estimated the weight of adult women from either photographs or a live presentation by a set of models and estimated the calories in 1 of 2 actual meals. The 2 meals had the same items, but 1 had larger portion sizes than the other. The results suggest: (a) Judgments are biased toward transforming the example in question to the size and/or(More)
In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether the personality trait of self-control protects against weight gain during the transition from childhood to adolescence. We obtained multi-method, multi-source measures of self-control from a socioeconomically and ethnically diverse sample of 105 fifth-grade students. Height and weight were recorded by(More)
The stigma-producing effects of "before and after" diet advertisements on a healthy weight sample were examined. Subjects (n = 59) were exposed to a presentation containing either a "before and after" diet ad, or solely the "before" or "after" picture embedded in a different ad. Subjects were then given measures to assess negative attitudes and endorsement(More)
We report that undergraduate females, unlike males, indicate a high degree of discomfort at the prospect of being weighed in the presence of male or female acquaintances. This discomfort is surprising, in that the other people present already have a good sense of the weight of the female by virtue of being able to see her. An analysis of this discomfort and(More)
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