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Metastasis is a multistep process during which cancer cells disseminate from the site of primary tumors and establish secondary tumors in distant organs. In a search for key regulators of metastasis in a murine breast tumor model, we have found that the transcription factor Twist, a master regulator of embryonic morphogenesis, plays an essential role in(More)
Cells with distinct phenotypes including stem-cell-like properties have been proposed to exist in normal human mammary epithelium and breast carcinomas, but their detailed molecular characteristics and clinical significance are unclear. We determined gene expression and genetic profiles of cells purified from cancerous and normal breast tissue using markers(More)
Fibroblasts often constitute the majority of the stromal cells within a breast carcinoma, yet the functional contributions of these cells to tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Using a coimplantation tumor xenograft model, we demonstrate that carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) extracted from human breast carcinomas promote the growth of admixed breast(More)
Here we describe the comprehensive gene expression profiles of each cell type composing normal breast tissue and in situ and invasive breast carcinomas using serial analysis of gene expression. Based on these data, we determined that extensive gene expression changes occur in all cell types during cancer progression and that a significant fraction of(More)
Mesenchymal stem cells have been recently described to localize to breast carcinomas, where they integrate into the tumour-associated stroma. However, the involvement of mesenchymal stem cells (or their derivatives) in tumour pathophysiology has not been addressed. Here, we demonstrate that bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells, when mixed with(More)
Multiple somatic rearrangements are often found in cancer genomes; however, the underlying processes of rearrangement and their contribution to cancer development are poorly characterized. Here we use a paired-end sequencing strategy to identify somatic rearrangements in breast cancer genomes. There are more rearrangements in some breast cancers than(More)
Sporadic basal-like cancers (BLC) are a distinct class of human breast cancers that are phenotypically similar to BRCA1-associated cancers. Like BRCA1-deficient tumors, most BLC lack markers of a normal inactive X chromosome (Xi). Duplication of the active X chromosome and loss of Xi characterized almost half of BLC cases tested. Others contained biparental(More)
Most tumors exhibit increased glucose metabolism to lactate, however, the extent to which glucose-derived metabolic fluxes are used for alternative processes is poorly understood. Using a metabolomics approach with isotope labeling, we found that in some cancer cells a relatively large amount of glycolytic carbon is diverted into serine and glycine(More)
Triple-negative breast cancer has recently been recognized as an important subgroup of breast cancer with a distinct outcome and therapeutic approach when compared with other subgroups of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer comprises primarily, but not exclusively, a molecularly distinct subtype of breast cancer, the basal-like subtype. We do not(More)
The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the(More)