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Within the European multi-centre MyoAge project, one workpackage was designed to investigate the contribution of age-related changes to muscle mass, contractile characteristics and neural control in relation to reductions in mobility in older age. The methodology has been described here. Test centres were located in Manchester, UK; Paris, France; Leiden,(More)
BACKGROUND There is growing recognition of the serious consequences of sarcopenia on the functionality and autonomy in old age. Recently, the age-related changes in several inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. The purposes of this systematic review were two-fold: (1) to describe the patterns of muscle strength loss(More)
Muscle ageing contributes to both loss of functional autonomy and increased morbidity. Muscle atrophy accelerates after 50 years of age, but the mechanisms involved are complex and likely result from the alteration of a variety of interrelated functions. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle chronological ageing in human,(More)
Low handgrip strength has been linked with premature mortality in diverse samples of middle-aged and elderly subjects. The value of handgrip strength as marker of "exceptional" human longevity has not been previously explored. We postulated that the genetic influence on extreme survival might also be involved in the muscular strength determination pathway.(More)
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Alone among herpesviruses, persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) markedly alters the numbers and proportions of peripheral immune cells in infected-vs-uninfected people. Because the rate of CMV infection increases with age in most countries, it has been suggested that it drives or at least exacerbates “immunosenescence”. This contention remains controversial and(More)
The Second International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence was held in Cambridge, UK, 2-4th December, 2010. The presentations covered four separate sessions: cytomegalovirus and T cell phenotypes; T cell memory frequency, inflation and immunosenescence; cytomegalovirus in aging, mortality and disease states; and the immunobiology of(More)
In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble(More)
The low percentages of naïve T cells commonly observed in elderly people are thought to be causally associated with mortality, primarily from infectious disease, and are taken as a hallmark of “immunosenescence”. Whether low levels of naive cells actually do associate with mortality has, however, not been tested in longitudinal studies. Here, we present(More)
Earlier, we showed that the offspring from exceptionally long-lived families have a more favorable glucose metabolism when compared with controls. As chronic low-grade inflammation has been regarded as a strong risk factor for insulin resistance, we evaluated if and to what extent the favorable glucose metabolism in offspring from long-lived families could(More)