Ananth V. Kini

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We investigate four performance metrics for randomized broadcast protocols on sensor networks: the fraction of nodes that receive the message (coverage), the number of first-time receivers per transmission (energy efficiency), the node-average normalized time till reception (per hop latency), and the average number of control messages per node (overhead).(More)
The broadcast capacity of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is defined as the maximum rate at which the network may generate messages intended for distribution to the entire network. Broadcast capacity is limited by factors such as communication collisions and excessive queue lengths incurred under heavy loads. Collisions may be avoided through the use of(More)
Few models in wireless communications have been addressed as thoroughly as slotted Aloha, and most important questions regarding its performance have been answered (e.g., stability). Although slotted time finite user Aloha with infinite backlog (no queueing analysis) and fixed (common) contention probability is trivial, incorporating queueing significantly(More)
With licensed spectrum at a premium, recent interest has shifted to investigating the possibility of utilizing unlicensed bands as a means of providing additional bandwidth. License assisted access (LAA) and Long Term Evolution-Unlicensed (LTE-U) are radio access technologies (RATs) aimed at providing carrier-grade wireless service in the 5 GHz unlicensed(More)
This work exploits the benefits of adaptive downtilt and vertical sectorization schemes for Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-A) networks equipped with active antenna systems (AAS). We highlight how the additional control in the elevation domain (via AAS) enables use of adaptive downtilt and vertical sectorization techniques, thereby improving system(More)
The broadcast capacity of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is defined as the maximum rate at which the network may generate messages intended for distribution to the entire network subject to coverage and delay constraints. Broadcast capacity depends on factors such as topology, collisions, node failures and queueing delays that may be incurred during heavy(More)
Current wireless system-level simulation frameworks utilize cell wraparound in order to reduce boundary effects and provide an accurate evaluation of system performance. The current wraparound technique is purely distance based, where UEs always pick the closest cells, ignoring the radio propagation characteristics of the channel. While this wraparound(More)
AHNs are wireless networks operating without the benefits of network infrastructure (basestations) or centralized control. AHNs working with limited spectrum perform best when simultaneous transmissions are coordinated to avoid collisions. Optimal transmission coordination is a combinatorial optimization problem that is, in general, intractable for large(More)