Amy M Richards

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Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) due to mutations in the SMN1 gene. In this study, an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human SMN (AAV8-hSMN) was injected at birth into the CNS of mice modeling SMA. Western blot analysis showed that these injections resulted in(More)
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene that result in a deficiency of SMN protein. One approach to treat SMA is to use antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to redirect the splicing of a paralogous gene, SMN2, to boost production of functional SMN. Injection of a(More)
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1). Previously, we showed that central nervous system (CNS) delivery of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding SMN1 produced significant improvements in survival in a mouse model of SMA. Here, we performed a dose-response study in SMA mice to(More)
Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) confer a heightened risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies, resulting in a lower age of onset and exacerbating disease progression. However, the precise mechanisms by which mutations in GBA increase PD risk and accelerate its progression remain unclear. Here, we investigated the(More)
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