Amir Karban

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Crohn's disease (CD) is a complex disorder resulting from the interaction of intestinal microbiota with the host immune system in genetically susceptible individuals. The largest meta-analysis of genome-wide association to date identified 71 CD-susceptibility loci in individuals of European ancestry. An important epidemiological feature of CD is that it is(More)
The Ashkenazi Jewish population has a several-fold higher prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) compared with non-Jewish European ancestry populations and has a unique genetic history. Haplotype association is critical to CD etiology in this population, most notably at NOD2, in which three causal, uncommon and conditionally independent NOD2 variants reside on(More)
BACKGROUND Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract associated with dysregulation of the immune response. It is caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Patients with CD have a TH1-type inflammatory response characterized by nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation. Mutations in the(More)
OBJECTIVES Perianal disease (PD) is a frequent complication of Crohn's disease (CD). The lack of association between PD and development of intestinal penetrating disease may suggest that PD is a distinct phenotype with specific genetic or clinical risk factors. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of genotype, clinical, and demographic(More)
Background. Colonoscopy for screening the population at an average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is recommended by many leading gastrointestinal associations. Objectives. The objective was to assess the quality, complications and acceptance rate of colonoscopy by patients. Methods. We prospectively gathered data from colonoscopies which were performed(More)
OBJECTIVE Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and Crohn's disease are autoinflammatory disorders, associated with genes (MEFV and NOD2/CARD15, respectively) encoding for regulatory proteins, important in innate immunity, apoptosis, cytokine processing, and inflammation. Although mutations in the MEFV gene were shown to modify Crohn's disease, the role of(More)
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