Ami Hauptman

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We propose an approach for developing efficient search algorithms through genetic programming. Focusing on the game of chess we evolve entire game-tree search algorithms to solve the Mate-In-N problem: find a key move such that even with the best possible counterplays, the opponent cannot avoid being mated in (or before) move N . We show that our evolved(More)
We have recently shown that genetically programming game players, after having imbued the evolutionary process with human intelligence, produces human-competitive strategies for three games: backgammon, chess endgames, and robocode (tank-fight simulation). Evolved game players are able to hold their own—and often win—against human or human-based(More)
In this paper, we evolve heuristics to guide staged deepening search for the hard game of FreeCell, obtaining top-notch solvers for this human-challenging puzzle. We first devise several novel heuristic measures using minimal domain knowledge and then use them as building blocks in two evolutionary setups involving a standard genetic algorithm and(More)
We evolve heuristics to guide IDA* search for the 6x6 and 8x8 versions of the Rush Hour puzzle, a PSPACE-Complete problem, for which no efficient solver has yet been reported. No effective heuristic functions are known for this domain, and--before applying any evolutionary thinking--we first devise several novel heuristic measures, which improve(More)
We use genetic programming to evolve highly successful solvers for two puzzles: Rush Hour and FreeCell. Many NP-Complete puzzles have remained relatively neglected by researchers (see (Kendall, Parkes, and Spoerer 2008) for a review). Among these difficult games we find the Rush Hour puzzle, which was proven to be PSPACEComplete for the general n×n case(More)
We evolve heuristics to guide staged deepening search for the hard game of FreeCell, obtaining top-notch solvers for this NP-Complete, human-challenging puzzle. We first devise several novel heuristic measures and then employ a Hillis-style coevolutionary genetic algorithm to find efficient combinations of these heuristics. Our results significantly surpass(More)
We use genetic algorithms to evolve highly successful solvers for two puzzles: FreeCell and Sliding-Tile Puzzle. Discrete puzzles, also known as single-player games, are an excellent problem domain for artificial intelligence research, because they can be parsimoniously described yet are often hard to solve (Pearl 1984). A well-known, highly popular example(More)