Amanda H Trees

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BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to the inability to fully activate the thigh muscles. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred(More)
BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The ACL may be damaged in isolation but often other ligaments and menisci are implicated. The injury may be managed surgically or conservatively. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to alteration in muscle function. Regaining muscular(More)
BACKGROUND Deficits in quadriceps femoris strength and voluntary activation have been well documented in chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but less is known about the acute or early phase after injury. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the levels of quadriceps voluntary activation (VA) and strength in both limbs(More)
BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The ACL may be damaged in isolation but often other ligaments and menisci are implicated. The injury may be managed surgically or conservatively. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to alteration in muscle function. Regaining muscular(More)
BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to the inability to fully activate the thigh muscles. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred(More)
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