Amanda Beatriz Barreto Macedo

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There have been exhaustive efforts to develop an efficient vaccine against leishmaniasis. Factors like host and parasite genetic characteristics, virulence, epidemiological scenarios, and, mainly, diverse immune responses triggered by Leishmania species make the achievement of this aim a complex task. It is already clear that the induction of a Th1,(More)
The presence of latent HIV-1 in infected individuals represents a major barrier preventing viral eradication. For that reason, reactivation of latent viruses in the presence of antiretroviral regimens has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to achieve remission. We screened for small molecules and identified several benzotriazole derivatives with the(More)
Despite the durable viral suppression afforded by antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 eradication will require strategies to target latently infected cells that persist in infected individuals. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is a promising strategy to reactivate latent proviruses and allow for subsequent recognition and clearance of infected cells by the(More)
HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses limit viral replication in untreated infection. After the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), these responses decay and the infected cell population that remains is commonly considered to be invisible to T-cells. We hypothesized that HIV antigen recognition may persist in ART-treated individuals due to low-level or(More)
Following proviral integration into the host cell genome and establishment of a latent state, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can reenter a productive life cycle in response to various stimuli. HIV-1 reactivation occurs when transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and activator(More)
HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses limit viral replication in untreated infection. After the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), these responses decay and the infected cell population that remains is commonly considered to be invisible to T-cells. We hypothesized that HIV antigen recognition may persist in ART-treated individuals due to low-level or(More)
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