Amalia Gothilf

Learn More
Primary damage caused by injury to the CNS is often followed by delayed degeneration of initially spared neurons. Studies in our laboratory have shown that active or passive immunization with CNS myelin-associated self-antigens can reduce this secondary loss. Here we show, using four experimental paradigms in rodents, that CNS trauma spontaneously evokes a(More)
Spinal cord injury results in a massive loss of neurons, and thus of function. We recently reported that passive transfer of autoimmune T cells directed against myelin-associated antigens provides acutely damaged spinal cords with effective neuroprotection. The therapeutic time window for the passive transfer of T cells was found to be at least 1 week. Here(More)
Injury-induced self-destructive processes cause significant functional loss after incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Cellular elements of both the innate (macrophage) and the adaptive (T-cell) immune response can, if properly activated and controlled, promote post-traumatic regrowth and protection after SCI. Dendritic cells (DCs) trigger activation of(More)
  • 1