Amal Korrida

Learn More
The houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata, is a declining cryptic desert bird whose range extends from North Africa to Central Asia. Three subspecies are currently recognized by geographical distribution and morphology: C.u.fuertaventurae, C.u.undulata and C.u.macqueenii. We have sequenced 854 bp of mitochondrial control region from 73 birds to describe(More)
Recent advances in molecular biology have made it possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in faeces to non-invasively sample endangered species for genetic studies. Here we use faeces as a source of DNA and mtDNA sequence data to elucidate the relationship among Spanish and Moroccan populations of great bustards. 834 bp of combined control region and(More)
With recent advances in molecular biology, it is now possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in faeces to non-invasively sample endangered species for genetic studies. A highly vulnerable population of approximately 100 great bustards (Otis tarda) exists in Morocco necessitating the use of non-invasive protocols to study their genetic structure. Here we(More)
The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) is a threatened avian species that is rapidly declining throughout its range, especially in North Africa, Asia and the Canary Islands. We examined the population structure and genetic variation for the three Houbara subspecies C. undulata undulata, C. u. fuertaventurae and C. u. macqueenii. A total of 266 birds(More)
A Moroccan Houbara Bustard pedigree was analyzed to evaluate the genetic variability in captive breeding population using genealogical approaches. The whole Houbara breeding flock (WP) for the period 1993-2004 was made up of 531 birds comprising 346 females and 185 males. The reference population (RP) comprised 198 individuals ready for reproduction from(More)
  • 1