Alper Yetil

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Oncogene-induced senescence is an important mechanism by which normal cells are restrained from malignant transformation. Here we report that the suppression of the c-Myc (MYC) oncogene induces cellular senescence in diverse tumor types including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. MYC inactivation was associated with prototypical markers(More)
MYC regulates the transcription of thousands of genes required to coordinate a range of cellular processes, including those essential for proliferation, growth, differentiation, apoptosis and self-renewal. Recently, MYC has also been shown to serve as a direct regulator of ribosome biogenesis. MYC coordinates protein synthesis through the transcriptional(More)
The Myc protein suppresses the transcription of several cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) via binding to Miz1; whether this interaction is important for Myc's ability to induce or maintain tumorigenesis is not known. Here we show that the oncogenic potential of a point mutant of Myc (MycV394D) that is selectively deficient in binding to Miz1 is(More)
MYC-induced T-ALL exhibit oncogene addiction. Addiction to MYC is a consequence of both cell-autonomous mechanisms, such as proliferative arrest, cellular senescence, and apoptosis, as well as non-cell autonomous mechanisms, such as shutdown of angiogenesis, and recruitment of immune effectors. Here, we show, using transgenic mouse models of MYC-induced(More)
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