Alison L. Cuff

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We report the latest release (version 3.0) of the CATH protein domain database (http://www.cathdb.info). There has been a 20% increase in the number of structural domains classified in CATH, up to 86 151 domains. Release 3.0 comprises 1110 fold groups and 2147 homologous superfamilies. To cope with the increases in diverse structural homologues being(More)
CATH version 3.5 (Class, Architecture, Topology, Homology, available at http://www.cathdb.info/) contains 173 536 domains, 2626 homologous superfamilies and 1313 fold groups. When focusing on structural genomics (SG) structures, we observe that the number of new folds for CATH v3.5 is slightly less than for previous releases, and this observation suggests(More)
The latest version of CATH (class, architecture, topology, homology) (version 3.2), released in July 2008 (http://www.cathdb.info), contains 114,215 domains, 2178 Homologous superfamilies and 1110 fold groups. We have assigned 20,330 new domains, 87 new homologous superfamilies and 26 new folds since CATH release version 3.1. A total of 28,064 new domains(More)
The latest version of the CATH-Gene3D protein structure classification database (4.0, http://www.cathdb.info) provides annotations for over 235,000 protein domain structures and includes 25 million domain predictions. This article provides an update on the major developments in the 2 years since the last publication in this journal including: significant(More)
CATH version 3.3 (class, architecture, topology, homology) contains 128,688 domains, 2386 homologous superfamilies and 1233 fold groups, and reflects a major focus on classifying structural genomics (SG) structures and transmembrane proteins, both of which are likely to add structural novelty to the database and therefore increase the coverage of protein(More)
This paper explores the structural continuum in CATH and the extent to which superfamilies adopt distinct folds. Although most superfamilies are structurally conserved, in some of the most highly populated superfamilies (4% of all superfamilies) there is considerable structural divergence. While relatives share a similar fold in the evolutionary conserved(More)
The ability to assign function to proteins has become a major bottleneck for comprehensively understanding cellular mechanisms at the molecular level. Here we discuss the extent to which structural domain classifications can help in deciphering the complex relationship between the functions of proteins and their sequences and structures. Structural(More)
In order to understand the evolution of enzyme reactions and to gain an overview of biological catalysis we have combined sequence and structural data to generate phylogenetic trees in an analysis of 276 structurally defined enzyme superfamilies, and used these to study how enzyme functions have evolved. We describe in detail the analysis of two(More)
TP53 encodes p53, which is a nuclear phosphoprotein with cancer-inhibiting properties. In response to DNA damage, p53 is activated and mediates a set of antiproliferative responses including cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Mutations in the TP53 gene are associated with more than 50% of human cancers, and 90% of these affect p53-DNA interactions, resulting(More)
The study of superfamilies of protein domains using a combination of structure, sequence and function data provides insights into deep evolutionary history. In the present paper, analyses of functional diversity within such superfamilies as defined in the CATH-Gene3D resource are described. These analyses focus on structure-function relationships in very(More)