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Glyphosate toxicity and the effects of long-term vegetation control on soil microbial communities
Abstract We assessed the direct and indirect effect of the herbicide glyphosate on soil microbial communities from ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa ) plantations of varying site quality. Direct,Expand
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Changes in microbial community structure following herbicide (glyphosate) additions to forest soils
Glyphosate applied at the recommended field rate to a clay loam and a sandy loam forest soil resulted in few changes in microbial community structure. Total and culturable bacteria, fungal hyphalExpand
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Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues
Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote CExpand
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Ectomycorrhizal Formation in Herbicide-Treated Soils of Differing Clay and Organic Matter Content
Herbicides are commonly used on private timberlands in the western United States for site preparation and control of competing vegetation. How non-target soil biota respond to herbicide applications,Expand
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Developing resilient ponderosa pine forests with mechanical thinning and prescribed fire in central Oregon's pumice region
Thinning and prescribed burning are common management practices for reducing fuel buildup in ponderosa pine forests. However, it is not well understood if their combined use is required to lowerExpand
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Non-Target Effects of Glyphosate on Soil Microbes
Glyphosate is among the most popular herbicides registered for forest use in California. Noted for its broad effectiveness on competing vegetation, mild effect on conifers, rapid inactivation inExpand
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Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues q
Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote CExpand