Learn More
BACKGROUND Few pancreatic cancers are suitable for surgery and few respond to chemoradiation. Photodynamic therapy produces local necrosis of tissue with light after prior administration of a photosensitising agent, and in experimental studies can be tolerated by the pancreas and surrounding normal tissue. AIMS To undertake a phase I study of photodynamic(More)
These guidelines are dedicated to the memory of Professor Keith Buchanan who devoted his life to the study of neuroendocrine tumours. N Clinical examination to exclude complex cancer syndromes (for example, multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1)) should be performed in all cases of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), and a family history taken (grade C). N In all(More)
BACKGROUND Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis apart from the few suitable for surgery. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) produces localised tissue necrosis but previous studies using the photosensitiser meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) caused prolonged skin photosensitivity. This study assessed a shorter acting photosensitiser,(More)
  • A R Gillams
  • 2005
Several different technologies have been employed for the local ablation of tissue by thermal techniques. At the present time the most widely favoured technique is radiofrequency ablation (RFA) but developments in other techniques, e.g. microwave may change this. In many countries RFA or percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) are accepted therapies for(More)
  • Alice Gillams
  • 2008
The last few years have seen a rapid expansion in the use and availability of ablation techniques with hundreds of papers published. Radiofrequency remains the front-runner in terms of cost, ease of set-up, versatility and flexibility but other techniques are catching up. Ablation with cryotherapy and microwave, which were previously only available at open(More)
  • Alice Gillams
  • 2009
The last few years have seen a rapid expansion in the use and availability of ablation techniques with hundreds of papers published. Radiofrequency remains the front-runner in terms of cost, ease of set-up, versatility and flexibility but other techniques are catching up. Ablation with cryotherapy and microwave, which were previously only available at open(More)
Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) provides an effective technique for minimally invasive tissue destruction. An alternating current delivered via a needle electrode causes localised ionic agitation and frictional heating of the tissue around the needle. Image-guided, percutaneous ablation techniques have been developed in most parts of the body, but the most(More)
  • A R Gillams
  • 2005
Percutaneous tumour ablation is a minimally invasive, image guided procedure which attracts a low morbidity (2%-10%) and procedure-related deaths are exceptional. As such it can be offered to patients who could not withstand more invasive procedures such as surgical resection. Complications can be divided into systemic and local, those related to the(More)
  • A Gillams
  • 2004
It is less than 20 years since the very first papers on ultrasound (US)-guided ablation of liver tumours were published. Initially ablation centred on US-guided percu-taneous ethanol injection (PEI) in small, non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet (NdYAG) laser heating techniques in liver metastases. Since then(More)
  • Alice Gillams
  • 2012
Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from <3 to 3.5 cm, either primary or secondary. Lung function usually recovers to pre-ablation values(More)