Learn More
Blood flow in the large systemic arteries is modeled using one-dimensional equations derived from the axisymmetric Navier–Stokes equations for flow in compliant and tapering vessels. The arterial tree is truncated after the first few generations of large arteries with the remaining small arteries and arterioles providing outflow boundary conditions for the(More)
The dynamic cerebral blood flow response to sudden hypotension during posture change is poorly understood. To better understand the cardiovascular response to hypotension, we used a windkessel model with two resistors and a capacitor to reproduce beat-to-beat changes in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler measurements) in(More)
Motivated by the need for three-dimensional methods for interface calculations that can deal with topology changes, we describe a numerical scheme, built from a volume-of-fluid interface tracking technique that uses a piecewise-linear interface calculation in each cell. Momentum balance is computed using explicit finite volume/finite differences on a(More)
Molecular detection of microorganisms requires microbial cell disruption to release nucleic acids. Sensitive detection of thick-walled microorganisms such as Bacillus spores and Mycobacterium cells typically necessitates mechanical disruption through bead beating or sonication, using benchtop instruments that require line power. Miniaturized, low-power,(More)
Windkessel and similar lumped models are often used to represent blood flow and pressure in systemic arteries. The windkessel model was originally developed by Stephen Hales (1733) and Otto Frank (1899) who used it to describe blood flow in the heart. In this paper we start with the onedimensional axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations for time-dependent(More)
The small-amplitude radial oscillations of a gas microbubble encapsulated by a viscoelastic solid shell and surrounded by a slightly compressible viscoelastic liquid are studied theoretically. The Kelvin–Voigt and 4-constant Oldroyd models are used to describe the viscoelastic properties of the shell and liquid, respectively. The equation for radial(More)
The transcription factor p53 is an important regulator of cell fate. Mutations in p53 gene are associated with many cancers. In response to signals such as DNA damage, p53 controls the transcription of a series of genes that cause cell cycle arrest during which DNA damage is repaired, or triggers programmed cell death that eliminates possibly cancerous(More)
Several recent experiments on DNA-damage-induced signaling networks in mammalian cells have shown interesting dynamics in p53 protein expression during the repair cycle. Pulses of p53 are produced, whose frequency and amplitude are fairly independent of the amount of damage, but the probability of a cell exhibiting this pulsatile behavior increases with(More)