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Maternal alcoholism and thiamine deficiency are frequently considered to be the causal agents of the central nervous system (CNS) damage associated with mental retardation in the offspring. For further understanding of pathological mechanisms underlying CNS damage in both disorders, histological studies were undertaken in developing rats to compare the(More)
The functional development of the central nervous system (CNS) in the rat was studied from the 10th to the 45th postnatal day, through the ontogeny of psychomotor and sensory functions, by a battery of behavioral tests. The ontogenetic development of 10 different functions was described. The results showed that novelty-induced functions matured(More)
A number of mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of thiamine deficiency in the alcoholic. Among these mechanisms are inadequate dietary intake of thiamine, impaired intestinal transport of the vitamin and decreased conversion of thiamine to the active coenzyme. The present study was undertaken to further investigate the mechanism by which alcohol(More)
The functional development of central nervous system (CNS) in the rat has been studied from the 10th to the 45th postnatal day, through a sensory function: nociception. Baseline pain responsiveness has been assessed with the tail-flick procedure. The mean tail-flick latency clearly decreases from the 10th to the 25th day, and remains stationary from this(More)
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