Alfred W. Pauson

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This paper describes a non-invasive, self-measured procedure by which the precancerous breast can be distinguished from the normal breast. The method involves wearing a specially designed thermometric brassiere for 90 min each evening at home through one menstrual cycle. Profiles of progesterone through the cycle, obtained from daily saliva sampling, and(More)
Wearing a special thermometric brassiere, twenty-five normal women self-measured their breast surface temperature. The subjects averaged 39 years of age and all were parous. Observations were made for one hour each evening for one menstrual cycle under semi-standardized domestic conditions. They also collected daily samples of saliva for radioimmunoassay of(More)
Wearing a special thermometric brassiere, selected women self-measured their breast surface temperature. These measurements were made during one hour each evening at home for one menstrual cycle under standard conditions of overclothing and room temperature. To stage their cycle they also collected daily samples of saliva in their freezer for immuno-assay(More)
In Britain and other high-risk countries, about a third of patients with breast cancer are premenopausal at diagnosis. In the remainder, tumour initiation might have occurred in the premenopause, even though the clinical presentation was late in life. This possibility has important implications for breast cancer prevention and screening. The relations(More)
Epidemiologists have established that women with small families, and particularly nulliparae, are prone to develop breast cancer later in life. We report that physiological mammary hypervascularity may be an intermediate reason against the background that breast-core vascularity is normal in pregnancy but pathological in the vascularisation of cancer. We(More)