Alexander von Wirth

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The common neurotransmitter serotonin controls different aspects of early neuronal differentiation, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that activation of the serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor promotes synaptogenesis and enhances synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons at early postnatal stages. An analysis of Gα(12)-deficient(More)
Serotonin (5-hydroxytrympamine or 5-HT) is one of the phylogenetically oldest neurotransmitters, and the serotonergic system is among the earliest developed neuronal systems. Serotonin is critically involved in regulating multiple physiological functions, acting via a heterogenic receptor family that includes G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion(More)
Regulation of neuronal morphology and activity-dependent synaptic modifications involves reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton in many cell types are controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, such as RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. As key regulators of both actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have also(More)
Experimental evidence suggests that most members of class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can form homomers and heteromers in addition to functioning as single monomers. In particular, serotonin (5-HT) receptors were shown to homodimerize and heterodimerize with other GPCRs, although the details and the physiological role of the oligomerization has(More)
Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of(More)
22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with learning and cognitive dysfunctions and a high risk of developing schizophrenia. It has become increasingly clear that dendritic spine plasticity is tightly linked to cognition. Thus, understanding how genes involved in cognitive disorders affect synaptic networks is a major challenge of modern biology.(More)
Experimental evidence suggests that most members of class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can form homomers and heteromers in addition to functioning as single monomers. In particular, serotonin (5-HT) receptors were shown to homodimerize and heterodimerize with other GPCRs, although the details and the physiological role of the oligomerization has(More)
PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine, on the basis of masticatory performance (MP), total muscle work (TMW), and range of movement (RoM), whether reduction of the profile of the cusps results in loss of the biomechanical effectiveness of chewing by healthy dentate patients. METHODS Twenty healthy patients (10 female, mean age: 24.1 ± 1.2(More)
Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) is a member of the Rho GTPase family which regulates a variety of cellular activities by controlling actin cytoskeleton and gene expression. Cdc42 is expressed in the form of two splice variants. The canonical Cdc42 isoform is prenylated (Cdc42-prenyl), whereas the brainspecific isoform can be palmitoylated (Cdc42-palm). In(More)
Human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) derived from the adult organism hold great promise for diverse settings in regenerative medicine. Therefore a more complete understanding of hBMSC biology to fully exploit the cells' potential for clinical settings is important. The protein CD24 has been reported to be involved in a diverse range of processes(More)