Alexander S. Boxerbaum

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In this work, we present a dynamic simulation of an earthworm-like robot moving in a pipe with radially symmetric Coulomb friction contact. Under these conditions, peristaltic locomotion is efficient if slip is minimized. We characterize ways to reduce slip-related losses in a constant-radius pipe. Using these principles, we can design controllers that can(More)
We have developed several innovative designs for a new kind of robot that uses peristalsis for locomotion, the same method that earthworms use, and report on the first completed prototype (Fig. 1). This form of locomotion is particularly effective in constrained spaces, and although the motion has been understood for some time, it has rarely been(More)
When a camera is affixed on a dynamic mobile robot, image stabilization is the first step towards more complex analysis on the video feed. This paper presents a novel electronic image stabilization (EIS) algorithm for highly dynamic mobile robotic platforms. The algorithm combines optical flow motion parameter estimation with angular rate data provided by a(More)
Surf-zone environments pose extreme challenges to robot operation. A robot that could autonomously navigate through the rocky terrain, constantly changing underwater currents, hard-packed moist sand, and loose dry sand characterizing this environment, would have very significant utility for a range of defence and civilian missions. The study of animal(More)
We have developed several innovative designs for a new kind of robot that uses a continuous wave of peristalsis for locomotion, the same method that earthworms use, and report on the first completed prototypes. This form of locomotion is particularly effective in constrained spaces, and although the motion has been understood for some time, it has rarely(More)
While soft-bodied animals have an extraordinarily diverse set of robust behaviors, soft-bodied robots have not yet achieved this flexiblity. In this paper, we explore controlling a truly continuously deformable structure with a CPG-like network. Our recently completed soft wormlike robot with a continuously deformable outer mesh, along with a continuum(More)
The capability of autonomous platforms to function on beaches is critical for a wide range of military and civilian operations. Of particular importance is the ability to autonomously navigate through rocky terrain, hard-packed moist sand, and loose dry sand typically found in these environments. The study of animal locomotion mechanisms provides specific(More)
The Biologically Inspired Robotics group at Case Western Reserve University has developed several innovative designs for a new kind of robot that uses peristalsis, the method of locomotion used by earthworms. Unlike previous wormlike robots, our concept uses a continuously deformable outer mesh that interpolates the body position between discrete actuators.(More)