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Human brain malformations, such as Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS) or isolated lissencephaly sequence (ILS) may result from abnormal neuronal migration during brain development. MDS and ILS patients have a hemizygous deletion or mutation in the LIS1 gene (PAFAH1B1), therefore, the LIS1 encoded protein (Lis1) may play a role in neuronal migration. Lis1 is a(More)
Mutations in the human Doublecortin (DCX) gene cause X-linked lissencephaly, a neuronal migration disorder. DCX binds to microtubules and actin filaments. Association of Dcx with F-actin is regulated by site-specific phosphorylation and by neurabin II, an F-actin binding protein that also binds to Dcx. We show here that neurabin II mediates(More)
The LIS1-encoded protein (Lis1) plays a role in brain development because a hemizygous deletion or mutation of the human gene causes neuronal migration disorders, such as Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS) or isolated lissencephaly sequence (ILS). Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have isolated a novel protein that interacts with mouse Lis1 (mLis1) which is(More)
Mutations in the human Doublecortin (DCX) gene cause X-linked lissencephaly, a neuronal migration disorder affecting the neocortex and characterized by mental retardation and epilepsy. Because dynamic cellular asymmetries such as those seen in cell migration critically depend on a cooperation between the microtubule and actin cytoskeletal filament systems,(More)
The neuronal migration protein doublecortin (DCX) that associates with microtubules through a tandem DCX repeat, is required for the development of the complex architecture of the human cerebral cortex. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with Dcx as bait, we have isolated neurabin II/spinophilin, an F-actin binding protein known to play a role in dendritic(More)
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