Alexander L. Watters

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Here we describe a blood-cleansing device for sepsis therapy inspired by the spleen, which can continuously remove pathogens and toxins from blood without first identifying the infectious agent. Blood flowing from an infected individual is mixed with magnetic nanobeads coated with an engineered human opsonin—mannose-binding lectin (MBL)—that captures a(More)
BACKGROUND Blood cultures, and molecular diagnostic tests that directly detect pathogen DNA in blood, fail to detect bloodstream infections in most infected patients. Thus, there is a need for a rapid test that can diagnose the presence of infection to triage patients, guide therapy, and decrease the incidence of sepsis. METHODS An Enzyme-Linked(More)
Studies on hematopoiesis currently rely on animal models because in vitro culture methods do not accurately recapitulate complex bone marrow physiology. We recently described a bone marrow-on-a-chip microfluidic device that enables the culture of living hematopoietic bone marrow and mimics radiation toxicity in vitro. In the present study, we used this(More)
OBJECTIVE Infusion of the heme-binding protein hemopexin has been proposed as a novel approach to decrease heme-induced inflammation in settings of red blood cell breakdown, but questions have been raised as to possible side effects related to protease activity and inhibition of chemotaxis. We evaluated protease activity and effects on chemotaxis of(More)
Magnetic nanoparticles have been employed to capture pathogens for many biological applications; however, optimal particle sizes have been determined empirically in specific capturing protocols. Here, a theoretical model that simulates capture of bacteria is described and used to calculate bacterial collision frequencies and magnetophoretic properties for a(More)
Dysfunctional T cells can mediate autoimmunity, but the inaccessibility of autoimmune tissues and the rarity of autoimmune T cells in the blood hinder their study. We describe a method to enrich and harvest autoimmune T cells in vivo by using a biomaterial scaffold loaded with protein antigens. In model antigen systems, we found that antigen-specific T(More)
Here we describe development of an extracorporeal hemoadsorption device for sepsis therapy that employs commercially available polysulfone or polyethersulfone hollow fiber filters similar to those used clinically for hemodialysis, covalently coated with a genetically engineered form of the human opsonin Mannose Binding Lectin linked to an Fc domain (FcMBL)(More)
Thrombosis and biofouling of extracorporeal circuits and indwelling medical devices cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We apply a bioinspired, omniphobic coating to tubing and catheters and show that it completely repels blood and suppresses biofilm formation. The coating is a covalently tethered, flexible molecular layer of(More)
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