Alexander Hagemann

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The accuracy of image-guided neurosurgery generally suffers from brain deformations due to intraoperative changes. These deformations cause significant changes of the anatomical geometry (organ shape and spatial interorgan relations), thus making intraoperative navigation based on preoperative images error prone. In order to improve the navigation accuracy,(More)
In order to improve the accuracy of image-guided neurosurgery, different biomechanical models have been developed to correct preoperative images with respect to intraoperative changes like brain shift or tumor resection. All existing biomechanical models simulate different anatomical structures by using either appropriate boundary conditions or by spatially(More)
The accuracy of image-guided neurosurgery generally suuers from brain deformations due to intraoperative c hanges, e.g. brain shift or tumor resection. In order to improve the accuracy, w e developed a biomechanical model of the human head which can be employed for the correction of preoperative images. By now, the model comprises two different materials(More)
The accuracy of image-guided neurosurgery generally suers from brain deformations due to intraoperative changes, e.g. brain shift or tumor resection. In order to improve the accuracy, we developed a biomechanical model of the human head which can be employed for the correction of preoperative images. By now, the model comprises two different materials while(More)
In order to improve the accuracy of image-guided neuro-surgery, diierent biomechanical models have been developed to correct preoperative images w.r.t. intraoperative changes like brain shift or tumor resection. For the simulation of deformations of anatomical structures with diierent material properties, all existing biomechanical models use either(More)
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