Alexander D. Schenkman

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The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model is employed to perform high-resolution numerical simulations of a mesoscale convective system and associated cyclonic line-end vortex (LEV) that spawned several tornadoes in central Oklahoma on 8–9 May 2007. The simulation uses a 1000 km 3 1000 km domain with 2-km horizontal grid spacing. The ARPS(More)
The impact of radar and Oklahoma Mesonet data assimilation on the prediction of mesovortices in a tor-nadic mesoscale convective system (MCS) is examined. The radar data come from the operational Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) and the Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere's (CASA) IP-1 radar(More)
The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) is used to simulate a tornadic mesovortex with the aim of understanding the associated tornadogenesis processes. The mesovortex was one of two tornadic meso-vortices spawned by a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that traversed southwestern and central Okla-homa on 8–9 May 2007. The simulation used 100-m(More)
A 50-m-grid-spacing Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) simulation of the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City tornadic supercell is examined. A 40-min forecast run on the 50-m grid produces two F3-intensity tornadoes that track within 10 km of the location of the observed long-track F4-intensity tornado. The development of both simulated tornadoes is analyzed(More)
The 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City tornadic supercell is predicted with the ARPS model using four nested grids with 9-km, 1-km, 100-m, and 50-m grid spacings. The Oklahoma City WSR-88D radar radial velocity and reflectivity data are assimilated through the ARPS 3DVAR and cloud analysis on the 1-km grid to generate an initial condition that includes a(More)
In this two-part paper, the impact of assimilating data from the WSR-88D and the Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere's (CASA) IP-1 radar network on the prediction of a tornadic mesoscale convective system is examined. The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) prediction model is employed to perform(More)
The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) prediction model is employed to perform high resolution numerical simulations of a mesoscale convective system and associated cyclonic line-end vortex (LEV) that spawned several tornadoes in central Oklahoma on 8-9 May 2007. The simulation uses a 1000 km x 1000 km domain with 2 km horizontal grid spacing. The(More)
a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t The current status and challenges associated with two aspects of Warn-on-Forecast—a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research project exploring the use of a convective-scale ensemble analysis and forecast system to support hazardous weather warning operations—are outlined. These two project aspects are(More)
33 34 The ARPS model is used to simulate a tornadic mesovortex with the aim of 35 understanding the associated tornadogenesis processes. The mesovortex was one of two tornadic 36 mesovortices spawned by a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that traversed southwest and 37 central Oklahoma on 8-9 May 2007. The simulation used 100-m horizontal grid spacing, and(More)