Alessio Giai Via

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Calcific tendinopathy (CT) of the tendons of the rotator cuff is common in white populations, with a reported prevalence varying from 2.7% to 22%, mostly affecting women between 30 and 50 years. Although CT shows a strong tendency toward self-healing by spontaneous resorption of the deposits, it does not always follow this typical pattern. The(More)
In calcific tendinopathy (CT), calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical(More)
The purpose of our investigation was to prospectively review and compare the early outcomes of Sanders II and III closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures (DIACFs) in a group of patients treated by open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws using the extended lateral approach or the sinus tarsi approach (STA). Thirty-eight(More)
The histologic lesion underlying overuse rotator cuff tendinopathy is a failed healing response, with haphazard proliferation of tenocytes, disruption of tendon cells and collagen fibers, and increased noncollagenous extracellular matrix. Recent attention has focused on the biological pathways by which tendons heal, leading to the identification of several(More)
Adhesive capsulitis is a condition "difficult to define, difficult to treat and difficult to explain from the point of view of pathology". This Codman's assertion is still actual because of a variable nomenclature, an inconsistent reporting of disease staging and many types of treatment. There is no consensus on how the best way best to manage patients with(More)
Muscle injuries are challenging problems for surgeons. Muscle trauma is commonly treated conservatively with excellent outcome results while surgical repair is advocated for larger tears/lacerations, where the optimal goal is restore of function. Repair of muscle belly lacerations is technically demanding because the sutures pull out and the likelihood of(More)
BACKGROUND acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is one of the few true emergencies in orthopedics and traumatology. It is a painful condition caused by the increase interstitial pressure (intracompart-mental pressure - ICP) within a closed osteofascial compartment which impair local circulation. It occurs most often in the legs, but it can affects also the(More)
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult, nonhematopoietic, stem cells that were initially isolated from bone marrow. Now they can be isolated from almost every tissue of the body. They have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineage, including bone, chondrocytes, adipocytes, tenocytes and cardiomyocytes, and it makes them an(More)
Subtalar joint arthroereisis (STA) can be used in the management of adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD), including posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. The procedure is quick and normally causes little morbidity; however, the implant used for STA often needs to be removed because of sinus tarsi pain. The present study evaluated the rate and risk(More)