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The structural characteristics of the three nuclear phosphoproteins of the high mobility group A family are outlined and related to their participation in chromatin structure alteration in many biological processes such as gene expression, neoplastic transformation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The elevated expression of these proteins in tumor cells and(More)
TP53 missense mutations dramatically influence tumor progression, however, their mechanism of action is still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate the fundamental role of the prolyl isomerase Pin1 in mutant p53 oncogenic functions. Pin1 enhances tumorigenesis in a Li-Fraumeni mouse model and cooperates with mutant p53 in Ras-dependent transformation. In(More)
The HMGA2 protein belongs to the HMGA family of architectural transcription factors, which play an important role in chromatin organization. HMGA proteins are overexpressed in several experimental and human tumors and have been implicated in the process of neoplastic transformation. Hmga2 knockout results in the pygmy phenotype in mice and in a decreased(More)
Signalling through Notch receptors requires ligand-induced cleavage to release the intracellular domain, which acts as a transcriptional activator in the nucleus. Deregulated Notch1 signalling has been implicated in mammary tumorigenesis; however the mechanisms underlying Notch activation in breast cancer remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the(More)
High mobility group I proteins (HMGI, HMGY and HMGI-C) are a family of low molecular mass non-histone nuclear proteins which constitute an important component of the active chromatin structure. Two members of this family, HMGI and HMGY, have been demonstrated to contribute to the transcriptional regulation of several promoters by interacting with the DNA(More)
High Mobility Group A (HMGA) is a family of architectural nuclear factors which play an important role in neoplastic transformation. HMGA proteins are multifunctional factors that associate both with DNA and nuclear proteins that have been involved in several nuclear processes including transcription. HMGA localization is exclusively nuclear but, to date,(More)
The expression of nuclear proteins high mobility group (HMG) I and HMGY was investigated in intraepithelial and invasive lesions of the uterine cervix. Human carcinoma cell lines C-41, ME-180, and CaSki were used for testing protein expression in neoplastic cells from the cervix. Morphological grading of the dysplasias (CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3) and invasive(More)
The homeodomain-containing protein Hex (also named Prh) is expressed in primitive endoderm (during the early phases of development), in some endoderm-derived tissues and in endothelial and hematopoietic precursors. Hex expression is exting-uished during terminal differentiation of endothelial and hematopoietic cells as well as in adult lung. Previous(More)
Nuclear phosphoprotein HMGA1a, high mobility group A1a, (previously HMGI) has been investigated during apoptosis. A change in the degree of phosphorylation of HMGA1a has been observed during apoptosis induced in four leukemic cell lines (HL60, K562, NB4, and U937) by drugs (etoposide, camptothecin) or herpes simplex virus type-1. Both hyper-phosphorylation(More)
Mammary epithelial stem cells are fundamental to maintain tissue integrity. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are implicated in both treatment resistance and disease relapse, and the molecular bases of their malignant properties are still poorly understood. Here we show that both normal stem cells and CSCs of the breast are controlled by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1.(More)