Aleisha N Collinson-Streng

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It has been hypothesized that HIV-1 viral load set-point is a surrogate measure of HIV-1 viral virulence, and that it may be subject to natural selection in the human host population. A key test of this hypothesis is whether viral load set-points are correlated between transmitting individuals and those acquiring infection. We retrospectively identified 112(More)
BACKGROUND A genetic bottleneck is known to exist for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at the point of sexual transmission. However, the nature of this bottleneck and its effect on viral diversity over time is unclear. METHODS Interhost and intrahost HIV diversity was analyzed in a stable population in Rakai, Uganda, from 1994 to 2002. HIV-1 envelope(More)
BACKGROUND Male circumcision reduces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) acquisition, and HSV-2 infection is associated with an increased risk of HIV acquisition. To assess the cellular basis for these associations, we estimated immunologic cellular densities in foreskin tissue. METHODS Immunostained CD1a(+)(More)
HIV superinfection, which occurs when a previously infected individual acquires a new distinct HIV strain, has been described in a number of populations. Previous methods to detect superinfection have involved a combination of labor-intensive assays with various rates of success. We designed and tested a next-generation sequencing (NGS) protocol to identify(More)
HIV-1 subtype D (HIV-1D) progresses to disease faster and has lower transmissibility than subtype A (HIV-1A). We examined whether these differences could lead to a population level change in the distribution of these subtypes over time. HIV-1 viral RNA was extracted from stored serum samples from HIV-positive subjects participating in a population-based(More)
To analyze HIV-1 subtype distribution, sequence analysis was performed on serum specimens obtained in 1994 from the Rakai Health Sciences community cohort in Uganda. Portions of gag-p24 and env-gp41 were sequenced and HIV subtype was determined for 773 subjects residing in 10 community clusters in rural Uganda. Subtypes A (17%) and D (70%) were the most(More)
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