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It has been shown (S. Lawrence, 2001, Nature, 411, 521) that journal articles which have been posted without charge on the internet are more heavily cited than those which have not been. Using data from the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ads.harvard.edu) and from the ArXiv e-print archive at Cornell University (arXiv.org) we examine the causes of this(More)
The NASA Astrophysics Data System Abstract Service has become a key component of astronomical research. It provides bibliographic information daily, or near daily, to a majority of astronomical researchers worldwide. We describe the history of the development of the system and its current status. Urania (Boyce 1996), and the ADS role in the emerging(More)
The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), along with astronomy's journals and data centers (a collaboration dubbed URANIA), has developed a distributed on-line digital library which has become the dominant means by which astronomers search, access and read their technical literature. Digital libraries such as the NASA Astrophysics Data System permit the easy(More)
By combining data from the text, citation, and reference databases with data from the ADS readership logs we have been able to create Second Order Bibliometric Operators, a customizable class of collaborative filters which permits substantially improved accuracy in literature queries. Using the ADS usage logs along with membership statistics from the(More)
Are the e-prints (electronic preprints) from the arXiv repository being used instead of the journal articles? In this paper we show that the e-prints have not undermined the usage of journal papers in the astrophysics community. As soon as the journal article is published, the astronomical community prefers to read the journal article and the use of(More)
The NASA Astrophysics Data System integrates a wealth of scientiic bibliographic and data resources|originally generated in multiple formats and available from multiple providers|in three discipline-oriented, centralized databases. Search and retrieval of the bibliographies and data sources is possible via a set of World Wide Web forms and interface(More)
Introduction: The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides various free services for finding , accessing, and managing bibliographic data, including a basic search form, the myADS notification service [1], and private library capabilities [2], plus access to scanned pages of published articles. The ADS also provides powerful search capabilities,(More)
The ADS abstract service at: http://adswww.harvard.edu has been updated considerably in the last year. New capabilities in the search engine include searching for multi-word phrases and searching for various logical combinations of search terms. Through optimization of the custom built search software, the search times were decreased by a factor of 4 in the(More)
The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established NASA and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning [...] its activities and the results thereof." The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information lead a grassroots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server(More)
Is there a difference in citation rates between articles that were published with links to data and articles that were not? Besides being interesting from a purely academic point of view, this question is also highly relevant for the process of furthering science. Data sharing not only helps the process of verification of claims, but also the discovery of(More)