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Practicing skilled tasks that involve the use of the hand and fingers has been shown to lead to adaptations within the central nervous system (CNS) underpinning improvements in the performance of the acquired task. However, neural adaptations following a period of strength training in the hand is not well understood. In order to determine the neural(More)
The contralateral transfer of strength following unilateral strength training (ULS) is thought to be due to changes within the nervous system. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we compared corticospinal responses following ULS of the right biceps brachii (BB) projecting to the untrained left BB. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from(More)
Cross-education strength training has being shown to retain strength and muscle thickness in the immobilized contralateral limb. Corticospinal mechanisms have been proposed to underpin this phenomenon; however, no transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) data has yet been presented. This study used TMS to measure corticospinal responses following 3 weeks of(More)
AIM Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to investigate the influence of 4 weeks of heavy load squat strength training on corticospinal excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (rectus femoris muscle). METHODS Participants (n = 12) were randomly allocated to a strength training or control group. The strength training(More)
The neural adaptations that mediate the increase in strength in the early phase of a strength training program are not well understood; however, changes in neural drive and corticospinal excitability have been hypothesized. To determine the neural adaptations to strength training, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to compare the effect of(More)
This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC-ISO) would attenuate the magnitude of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Young untrained men were placed into one of the two experimental groups or one control group (n = 13 per group). Subjects in the experimental groups performed either two or 10 MVC-ISO of the elbow(More)
PURPOSE This study compared the effect of an initial exercise consisting of either low-intensity eccentric or maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) on protective effect against maximal eccentric contraction (MaxECC)-induced muscle damage. METHODS Untrained young men were placed into one of five groups (n = 13 per group): MaxECC, 10% ECC, 20% ECC, 90° ISO,(More)
The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate motor cortex (cortical) excitability between a similar fine visuomotor task of varying difficulty. Ten healthy adults (three female, seven male; 20-45 years of age) participated in the study. Participants were instructed to perform a fine visuomotor task by statically abducting their first index finger(More)
This study investigated the time wise protective effect conferred by two maximal voluntary isometric contractions (2MVCs) at 20° elbow flexion on muscle damage induced by 30 maximal isokinetic (60° s−1) eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors (MaxECC). Sixty-five young untrained men were randomly assigned to a control group that did not perform 2MVCs,(More)
The human central nervous system (CNS) has the ability to modulate its activity during the performance of different movements. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the CNS can also modulate its activity in the same movement but with increased precision during a visuomotor static task. This study aimed to extend on these findings by using transcranial(More)