Alan C. L. Yu

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Variation is a ubiquitous feature of speech. Listeners must take into account context-induced variation to recover the interlocutor's intended message. When listeners fail to normalize for context-induced variation properly, deviant percepts become seeds for new perceptual and production norms. In question is how deviant percepts accumulate in a systematic(More)
Numerous studies have documented the phenomenon of phonetic imitation: the process by which the production patterns of an individual become more similar on some phonetic or acoustic dimension to those of her interlocutor. Though social factors have been suggested as a motivator for imitation, few studies has established a tight connection between(More)
Cross-linguistically, vowel duration is often found to be inversely related to the approximate average f0; all else being equal, vowels on low tones are longer than those on high tones, while vowels on rising tones are longer than those on falling tones. This type of interplay between tonal contrasts and duration is commonly reflected in the world’s(More)
Mutation has typically been viewed in autosegmental frameworks as an instance of ‘object’-type morphology. The central claim of autosegmental phonology (Goldsmith 1976) is that tones, features, and length/weight (that is, moras, in the currently prevailing view) are representational entities in their own right, not simply attributes of segments. Mutation(More)
Few notions in phonological theory have received as much attention in the literature as opacity. In the almost 40 years since Kiparsky (1971, 1976) offered the defi nition given in (1), the bulk of the attention paid to opacity has been relatively recent and has been fueled by the fi eld’s massive (but incomplete) shift from the rule-based serialism(More)
Stress-sensitive quantity alternation is commonplace in the Uralic languages and many of the Germanic languages in and around the Scandinavia region, but few reports have detailed similar types of alternation in Native American languages. This study offers a quantitative analysis of the complementary length alternation between tonic vowels and post-tonic(More)
Numerous studies have documented the phenomenon of phonetic convergence: the process by which speakers alter their productions to become more similar on some phonetic or acoustic dimension to those of their interlocutor. Though social factors have been suggested as a motivator for imitation, a relatively smaller body of studies has established a tight(More)