Akihiko Taguchi

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S100/calgranulin polypeptides are present at sites of inflammation, likely released by inflammatory cells targeted to such loci by a range of environmental cues. We report here that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a central cell surface receptor for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE-binding protein) and related members of the S100/calgranulin(More)
The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a multi-ligand member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules, interacts with distinct molecules implicated in homeostasis, development and inflammation, and certain diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Engagement of RAGE by a ligand triggers activation of key cell(More)
Recent studies suggested that interruption of the interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), with the signal-transducing receptor receptor for AGE (RAGE), by administration of the soluble, extracellular ligand-binding domain of RAGE, reversed vascular hyperpermeability and suppressed accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic rodents. Since the(More)
Thrombo-occlusive cerebrovascular disease resulting in stroke and permanent neuronal loss is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Because of the unique properties of cerebral vasculature and the limited reparative capability of neuronal tissue, it has been difficult to devise effective neuroprotective therapies in cerebral ischemia. Our results(More)
Neural activity induces the remodeling of pre- and postsynaptic membranes, which maintain their apposition through cell adhesion molecules. Among them, N-cadherin is redistributed, undergoes activity-dependent conformational changes, and is required for synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that depolarization induces the enlargement of the width of spine(More)
Advanced glycation end products (AGE) contribute to diabetic tissue injury by two major mechanisms, i.e., the alteration of extracellular matrix architecture through nonenzymatic glycation, with formation of protein crosslinks, and the modulation of cellular functions through interactions with specific cell surface receptors, the best characterized of which(More)
OBJECTIVE Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues primarily by stimulating the translocation of vesicles containing a facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT4, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane. The formation of stable soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein receptor(More)
Increasing evidence shows that neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be activated in the nonconventional neurogenic zones such as the cortex following ischemic stroke. However, the precise origin, identity, and subtypes of the ischemia-induced NSPCs (iNSPCs), which can contribute to cortical neurogenesis, is currently still unclear. In our present study,(More)
It is well established that leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins such as connectin, slit, chaoptin, and Toll have pivotal roles in neuronal development in Drosophila as cell adhesion molecules. However, to date, little information concerning mammalian LRR proteins has been reported. In the present study, we sought LRR proteins of the mouse brain, based on the(More)
Acute inflammation in the poststroke period exacerbates neuronal damage and stimulates reparative mechanisms, including neurogenesis. However, only a small fraction of neural stem/progenitor cells survives. In this report, by using a highly reproducible model of cortical infarction in SCID mice, we examined the effects of immunodeficiency on reduction of(More)