Aedan Roberts

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Colorectal cancers arising from serrated polyps are characterized by the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and somatic mutation (V600E) in the BRAF proto-oncogene. Few epidemiologic studies have investigated risk factors for these tumors. We conducted a cohort study of 41,328 residents of Melbourne, Australia that included 9,939 participants of(More)
BACKGROUND Patients with multiple serrated polyps are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent reports have linked cigarette smoking with the subset of CRC that develops from serrated polyps. The aim of this work therefore was to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of CRC in high-risk genetics clinic patients(More)
Hyperplastic polyposis is a colonic polyposis condition of unknown aetiology. The purpose of this study was to examine the spectrum of phenotypic variation in patients with multiple serrated polyps as a basis for gene discovery. One hundred and twenty-six patients with multiple (≥5) serrated polyps were recruited to the study. Polyp counts were extracted(More)
The identification of Lynch syndrome has been greatly assisted by the advent of tumour immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and by the recognition of the role of acquired somatic BRAF mutation in sporadic MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC). However, somatic BRAF mutation may also be present in the tumours in families with a(More)
Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops within precursor lesions in the single-celled epithelial lining of the gut. The two most common epithelial lesions are the adenoma and the serrated polyp. CRC is also one of the most familial of the common cancers, and just as there are syndromes associated with increased risk of CRC arising in adenomas, there are also(More)
Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch syndrome have well defined genetic causes, the search for variants underlying the remainder of familial CRC is plagued by genetic heterogeneity. The recent identification(More)
Background Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and Lynch Syndrome (Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer, HNPCC) are caused by well defined genetic defects, the search for variants underlying the remainder of(More)
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