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The human brain is a complex dynamic system capable of generating a multitude of oscillatory waves in support of brain function. Using fMRI, we examined the amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFO) observed in the human resting brain and the test-retest reliability of relevant amplitude measures. We confirmed prior reports that gray matter(More)
Functional connectomics is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of neuroimaging research. Yet, concerns remain regarding the use of resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) to characterize inter-individual variation in the functional connectome. In particular, recent findings that "micro" head movements can introduce artifactual inter-individual and group-related(More)
Empirical evidence increasingly supports the hypothesis that patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) are sculpted by a history of evoked coactivation within distinct neuronal networks. This, together with evidence of strong correspondence among the networks defined by iFC and those delineated using a variety of other neuroimaging techniques,(More)
Central to the development of clinical applications of functional connectomics for neurology and psychiatry is the discovery and validation of biomarkers. Resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) is emerging as a mainstream approach for imaging-based biomarker identification, detecting variations in the functional connectome that can be attributed to clinical variables(More)
The resting brain exhibits coherent patterns of spontaneous low-frequency BOLD fluctuations. These so-called resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) networks are posited to reflect intrinsic representations of functional systems commonly implicated in cognitive function. Yet, the direct relationship between RSFC and the BOLD response induced by task(More)
The vast majority of mental illnesses can be conceptualized as developmental disorders of neural interactions within the connectome, or developmental miswiring. The recent maturation of pediatric in vivo brain imaging is bringing the identification of clinically meaningful brain-based biomarkers of developmental disorders within reach. Even more auspicious(More)
Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (R-fMRI) holds the promise to reveal functional biomarkers of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, extracting such biomarkers is challenging for complex multi-faceted neuropathologies, such as autism spectrum disorders. Large multi-site datasets increase sample sizes to compensate for this complexity, at(More)
The brain's energy economy excessively favors intrinsic, spontaneous neural activity over extrinsic, evoked activity, presumably to maintain its internal organization. Emerging hypotheses capable of explaining such an investment posit that the brain's intrinsic functional architecture encodes a blueprint for its repertoire of responses to the external(More)
Working memory (WM) is central to the acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout childhood and adolescence. While numerous behavioral and task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have examined WM development, few have used resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI). Here, we present a systematic R-fMRI examination of age-related differences in(More)
To date, only one study has examined test-retest reliability of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) in children, none in clinical developing groups. Here, we assessed short-term test-retest reliability in a sample of 46 children (11-17.9 years) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 57 typically developing children (TDC). Our primary test-retest(More)