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An expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A fundamental question is whether toxicity is driven by the repeat RNA itself and/or by dipeptide repeat proteins generated by repeat-associated, non-ATG translation. To address this question, we developed in vitro and in vivo(More)
Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Understanding the disease mechanisms and a method for clinical diagnostic genotyping have been hindered because of the difficulty in estimating the expansion size. We found 96 repeat-primed PCR expansions:(More)
Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders of aging are characterized by clinical and pathological features that are relatively specific to humans. To obtain greater insight into how brain aging has evolved, we compared age-related gene expression changes in the cortex of humans, rhesus macaques, and mice on a genome-wide scale. A small(More)
Relating clinical symptoms to neuroanatomical profiles of brain damage and ultimately to tissue pathology is a key challenge in the field of neurodegenerative disease and particularly relevant to the heterogeneous disorders that comprise the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum. Here we present a retrospective analysis of clinical, neuropsychological(More)
A large Danish family has previously been reported in which autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is genetically linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3). A mutation was recently identified in the CHMP2B gene that is probably responsible for causing disease in this family. Because of its neuropathologic findings, FTD-3 was originally categorized as a(More)
An expanded GGGGCC repeat in a non-coding region of the C9orf72 gene is a common cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Non-coding repeat expansions may cause disease by reducing the expression level of the gene they reside in, by producing toxic aggregates of repeat RNA termed RNA foci, or by producing toxic(More)
The charged multivesicular body protein 2B gene (CHMP2B) was recently associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) linked to chromosome 3 in a Danish FTLD family (FTD-3). In this family, a mutation in the acceptor splice site of exon 6 produced two aberrant transcripts predicting two C-truncated CHMP2B proteins due to a read through of intron 5(More)
C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions are the most common cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) worldwide. The clinical presentation is often indistinguishable from classic FTD or ALS, although neuropsychiatric symptoms are more prevalent and, for ALS, behavioural and cognitive symptoms occur more(More)
Mutations in valosin-containing protein (VCP) are associated with a syndromic constellation of inclusion body myositis, Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia. Here we describe the case reports of two patients with a novel variation (p.I27V) in the VCP gene that was not identified in a healthy control population. One patient presented with a(More)
The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) are required to sort integral membrane proteins into intralumenal vesicles of the multivesicular body (MVB). Mutations in the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP2B were recently associated with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), neurodegenerative diseases characterized by(More)