Adamantios I. Gafos

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  • Luigi Burzio, Ioana Chitoran, Mohamed Elmedlaoui, Mohamed Guerssel, Ali Idrisi, Paul +1 other
  • 2001
1 I wish to thank three anonymous reviewers for valuable feedback and Michael Kenstowicz for detailed comments which have been extremely helpful in improving this paper. I am grateful to Jeffrey Heath without whose work on Moroccan Arabic and his generous assistance with my questions this work would not have been possible; and to Louis Goldstein for(More)
Competing proposals on the syllabification of initial consonants in Moroccan Arabic are evaluated using a combination of experimental and modelling techniques. The proposed model interprets an input syllable structure as a set of articulatory landmarks coordinated in time. This enables the simulation of temporal patterns associated with the input syllable(More)
The derivational view of phonetics-phonology (Ladd, this volume) expresses an intuition that seems valid, namely, that there is a distinction to be made between quantitative and qualitative aspects of phonetics-phonology. Incomplete neutralization (Ernestus and Baayen, this volume) and other phenomena like it indicate that the specific way of drawing that(More)
Competing proposals on the syllabification of initial consonants in Moroccan Arabic are evaluated using a combination of experimental and modelling techniques. The proposed model interprets an input syllable structure as a set of articulatory landmarks coordinated in time. This enables the simulation of temporal patterns associated with the input syllable(More)
Does the productive use of language stem from the manipulation of mental variables (e.g. "noun", "any consonant")? If linguistic constraints appeal to variables, rather than instances (e.g. "dog", "m"), then they should generalize to any representable novel instance, including instances that fall beyond the phonological space of a language. We test this(More)
Using a combination of magnetometry and ultrasound, we examined the articulatory characteristics of the so-called 'transparent' vowels [i], [i], and [e] in Hungarian vowel harmony. Phonologically, transparent vowels are front, but they can be followed by either front or back suffixes. However, a finer look reveals an underlying phonetic coherence in two(More)