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  • BARRY NALEBUFF, Kyle Bagwell, +6 authors Michael Rior
  • 2004
In this paper we look at the case for bundling in an oligopolistic environment. We show that bundling is a particularly effective entry-deterrent strategy. A company that has market power in two goods, A and B, can, by bundling them together, make it harder for a rival with only one of these goods to enter the market. Bundling allows an incumbent to(More)
Locality and non-contextuality are intuitively appealing features of classical physics, which are contradicted by quantum mechanics. The goal of the classic no-go theorems by Bell, Kochen-Specker, et al. is to show that non-locality and contextuality are necessary features of any theory whose predictions agree with those of quantum mechanics. We use the(More)
and Yale gave valuable comments. An associate editor and two referees made very helpful observations and suggestions. Abstract Correlations arise naturally in non-cooperative games, e.g., in the equivalence between undominated and optimal strategies in games with more than two players. But the non-cooperative assumption is that players do not coordinate(More)
Paradoxes of game-theoretic reasoning have played an important role in spurring developments in interactive epistemology, the area in game theory that studies the role of the players' beliefs, knowledge, etc. This paper describes two such paradoxes—one concerning backward-induction, the other iterated weak dominance. We start with the basic epistemic(More)