Abner Shimony

Learn More
Quantum mechanics permits nonlocality—both nonlocal correlations and nonlocal equations of motion—while respecting relativistic causality. Is quantum mechanics the unique theory that reconciles nonlocality and causality? We consider two models, going beyond quantum mechanics, of nonlocality— " superquantum " correlations, and nonlocal " jamming " of(More)
1 It seems to me that it is among the most sure-footed of quantum physicists, those who have it in their bones, that one finds the greatest impatience with the idea that the 'foundations of quantum mechanics' might need some attention. Knowing what is right by instinct, they can become a little impatient with nit-picking distinctions between theorems and(More)
(née Brownlee and always called Annie), whose families had lived in Northern Ireland for several generations. His middle name, Stewart, was a Scottish family name in his mother's lineage, and until he went to university he was called by that name. The family's religion was Anglican (Church of Ireland), but no religious bias prevented friendships with the(More)
Quantum mechanics is undoubtedly a weird field of science, which violates many deep conceptual tenets of classical physics, requiring reconsideration of the concepts on which classical physics is based. For instance, it permits persistent correlations between classically separated systems, that are termed as entanglement. To circumvent these problems and(More)
(1928–90) was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, son of John and Annie Bell, whose families had lived in Northern Ireland for several generations. His middle name, Stewart, was the Scottish family name of his mother, and until he went to university he was called at home by that name. The family's religion was Anglican (Church of Ireland), but no religious(More)
(1928–90) was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, son of John and Annie Bell, whose families had lived in Northern Ireland for several generations. His middle name, Stewart, was the Scottish family name of his mother, and until he went to university he was called at home by that name. The family's religion was Anglican (Church of Ireland), but no religious(More)
  • 1