Abhishek Trigunaite

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Sex-based disparities in immune responses are well known phenomena. The two most important factors accounting for the sex-bias in immunity are genetics and sex hormones. Effects of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone are well established, however the role of testosterone is not completely understood. Evidence from unrelated studies points to an(More)
There are overwhelming data supporting the inflammatory origin of some epilepsies (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis and limbic encephalitis). Inflammatory epilepsies with an autoimmune component are characterized by autoantibodies against membrane-bound, intracellular or secreted proteins (e.g., voltage gated potassium channels). Comparably, little is known(More)
OBJECTIVE Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) develops much more readily in females than in males. Previous research has focused primarily on identifying mechanisms pertinent to the pathology in females. The aim of the current study was to delineate active protective mechanisms in males. We present evidence of a new male-associated mechanism of protection(More)
Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by elevated production of autoreactive Abs. The disease has a much higher prevalence in women than in men. Although testosterone has been shown to be protective in the disease, and estrogens exacerbating, the discrepancy in prevalence between men and women is still not well understood and(More)
Most systemic autoimmune diseases occur more frequently in females than in males. This is particularly evident in Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythromatosis (SLE) and thyroid autoimmunity, where the ratio of females to males ranges from 20:1 to 8:1. Our understanding of the etiology of SLE implies important roles for genetics, environmental factors(More)
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