Abelardo I. Aguilera

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BACKGROUND During continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, the peritoneum is exposed to bioincompatible dialysis fluids that cause denudation of mesothelial cells and, ultimately, tissue fibrosis and failure of ultrafiltration. However, the mechanism of this process has yet to be elucidated. METHODS Mesothelial cells isolated from effluents in dialysis(More)
BACKGROUND During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneum is exposed to bioincompatible dialysis fluids that cause epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells, fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Ultrafiltration failure is associated with high transport rates and increased vascular surface, indicating the implication of vascular endothelial growth(More)
Peritoneal membrane fibrosis, ranging from mild inflammation to severe sclerosing peritonitis, is one of the complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). In parallel with fibrosis, the peritoneum shows a progressive increase of capillaries and vasculopathy, involved in increased small solute transport across the membrane and ultrafiltration failure. Glucose(More)
During peritoneal dialysis (PD), mesothelial cells undergo mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), a process associated with peritoneal-membrane dysfunction. Because TGF-β1 can induce MMT, we evaluated the efficacy of TGF-β1-blocking peptides in modulating MMT and ameliorating peritoneal damage in a mouse model of PD. Exposure of the peritoneum to PD(More)
Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a form of renal replacement and is based on the use of the peritoneum as a semipermeable membrane across which ultrafiltration and diffusion take place. Nevertheless, continuous exposure to bioincompatible PD solutions and episodes of peritonitis or hemoperitoneum cause acute and chronic inflammation and injury to the peritoneal(More)
Ultrafiltration (UF) failure is a consequence of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). Fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy are causes of this functional disorder after 3-8 years on PD. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cell (MC) is a key process leading to peritoneal fibrosis with functional deterioration. Our purpose was to study(More)
BACKGROUND Peritoneal membrane deterioration during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MC), which is believed to be mainly due to glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. Here we investigate the impact of GDPs in PD solutions on the EMT of MC in vitro and ex vivo.(More)
BACKGROUND Ghrelin is a recently discovered protein hormone mainly synthesized in the gastric endocrine cells. This hormone not only is a potent growth hormone secretagogue but also is involved in the regulation of food ingestion and energy metabolism. Derangements in ghrelin secretion in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) have not been fully(More)
During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneum is exposed to bioincompatible dialysis fluids, which causes progressive fibrosis and angiogenesis and, ultimately, ultrafiltration failure. In addition, repeated episodes of peritonitis or hemoperitoneum may accelerate all these processes. Fibrosis has been classically considered the main cause of peritoneal(More)
Peritoneal fibrosis (or sclerosis) is a complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and includes a wide spectrum of peritoneal structural changes, ranging from mild inflammation to severe sclerosing peritonitis and encapsulating-sclerosing peritonitis. In parallel with fibrosis, the peritoneum shows a progressive increase in capillary number (angiogenesis) and(More)