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Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol(More)
Recent evidence shows that mycobacteria have developed novel and specialized secretion systems for the transport of extracellular proteins across their hydrophobic, and highly impermeable, cell wall. Strikingly, mycobacterial genomes encode up to five of these transport systems. Two of these systems, ESX-1 and ESX-5, are involved in virulence - they both(More)
ESX-5 is one of the five type VII secretion systems found in mycobacteria. These secretion systems are also known as ESAT-6-like secretion systems. Here, we have determined the secretome of ESX-5 by a proteomic approach in two different strains of Mycobacterium marinum. Comparison of the secretion profile of wild-type strains and their ESX-5 mutants showed(More)
Mycobacterial genomes contain two unique gene families, the so-called PE and PPE gene families, which are highly expanded in the pathogenic members of this genus. Here we report that one of the PPE proteins, i.e. PPE41, is secreted by pathogenic mycobacteria, both in culture and in infected macrophages. As PPE41 lacks a signal sequence a dedicated secretion(More)
During infection of humans and animals, pathogenic mycobacteria manipulate the host cell causing severe diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. To understand the basis of mycobacterial pathogenicity, it is crucial to identify the molecular virulence mechanisms. In this study, we address the contribution of ESX-1 and ESX-5--two homologous type VII(More)
The type VII secretion system ESX-5 is a major pathway for export of PE and PPE proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. These mycobacteria-specific protein families are characterized by conserved N-terminal domains of 100 and 180 amino acids, which contain the proline-glutamic acid (PE) and proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) motifs after which they are named.(More)
The ESX-5 secretion system of pathogenic mycobacteria is responsible for the secretion of various PPE and PE-PGRS proteins. To better understand the role of ESX-5 effector proteins in virulence, we analyzed the interactions of Mycobacterium marinum ESX-5 mutant with human macrophages (Mphi). Both wild-type bacteria and the ESX-5 mutant were internalized and(More)
ESX-5 is a mycobacterial type VII protein secretion system responsible for transport of numerous PE and PPE proteins. It is involved in the induction of host cell death and modulation of the cytokine response in vitro. In this work, we studied the effects of ESX-5 in embryonic and adult zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum. We found that ESX-5-deficient M.(More)
Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S) systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show(More)
Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in a large number of poikilothermic animals and is used as a model for mycobacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we infected zebra fish (Danio rerio) with different strains of M. marinum to determine the variation in pathogenicity. Depending on the M. marinum isolate, the fish(More)