Learn More
A biofilm is a surface-associated population of microorganisms embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms are a major natural growth form of microorganisms and the cause of pervasive device-associated infection. This report focuses on the biofilm matrix of Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans. We report here that(More)
The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is frequently associated with catheter-based infections because of its ability to form resilient biofilms. Prior studies have shown that the transcription factor Bcr1 governs biofilm formation in an in vitro catheter model. However, the mechanistic role of the Bcr1 pathway and its relationship to biofilm formation in(More)
The impact of many microorganisms on their environment depends upon their ability to form surface bound communities called biofilms [1]. Biofilm formation on implanted medical devices has severe consequences for human health by providing both a portal of entry and a sanctuary for invasive bacterial and fungal pathogens [1 and 2]. Biofilm regulators and(More)
BACKGROUND Biofilms are surface-associated microbial communities with significant environmental and medical impact. Here, we focus on an adherence mechanism that permits biofilm formation by Candida albicans, the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans. RESULTS The Als surface-protein family has been implicated in biofilm formation, and we show that Als1(More)
Hwp1 is a well-characterized Candida albicans cell surface protein, expressed only on hyphae, that mediates tight binding to oral epithelial cells. Prior studies indicate that HWP1 expression is dependent upon Bcr1, a key regulator of biofilm formation. Here we test the hypothesis that Hwp1 is required for biofilm formation. In an in vitro model, the(More)
Biofilm formation by the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a complex process with significant consequences for human health: it contributes to implanted medical device-associated infections. Recent advances in gene expression profiling and genetic analysis have begun to clarify the mechanisms that govern C. albicans biofilm development and(More)
Candida biofilms formed on indwelling medical devices are increasingly associated with severe infections. In this study, we used proteomics and Western and Northern blotting analyses to demonstrate that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is downregulated in Candida biofilms. Disruption of ADH1 significantly (P = 0.0046) enhanced the ability of Candida albicans to(More)
The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI) genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both(More)
Candida albicans is a causative agent of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), a biofilm-like infection of the oral mucosa. Biofilm formation depends upon the C. albicans transcription factor Bcr1, and previous studies indicate that Bcr1 is required for OPC in a mouse model of infection. Here we have used a nanoString gene expression measurement platform to(More)