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Sensorimotor adaptation, the ability to adjust motor output in response to persistent changes in sensory input, is a key function of the central nervous system. Although a great deal is known about vestibulo-ocular reflex and saccadic adaptation, relatively little is known about the behavior and neural mechanisms underlying gaze adaptation when the head is(More)
The ability to adjust the amplitude of gaze shifts in response to persistent visual errors ("gaze adaptation") has been investigated primarily by introducing visual errors at the end of saccades produced by head-restrained primates. Very little is known about the behavior and neural mechanisms underlying gaze adaptation when the head is free to move. We(More)
When the head is prevented from moving, it has been clearly demonstrated that the horizontal and vertical components of oblique saccades are not independently produced. The duration of the smaller of the two components is stretched in time to match the duration of the larger component. Several hypotheses have been proposed and each can account for the(More)
Decades of behavioral observations have shown that invertebrate and vertebrate species have the ability to distinguish between self-generated afferent inputs versus those that are generated externally. In the present article, I describe activities focused around the discussion of a classic American Physiological Society paper by Curtis C. Bell that lays the(More)
A growing portion of premedical curricula is being devoted to the study of physiological mechanisms underlying animal behavior. In the present article, I describe an activity centered around a classic Journal of Neurophysiology paper by Edward V. Evarts that lays the foundation for students to investigate common behavioral and physiological techniques used(More)
Cecala AL. Using a classic paper by Evarts as a platform for discussing cortical control of skeletal muscle in awake, behaving primates. portion of premedical curricula is being devoted to the study of physiological mechanisms underlying animal behavior. In the present article, I describe an activity centered around a classic Journal of Neurophysiology(More)
When the head does not move, rapid movements of the eyes called saccades are used to redirect the line of sight. Saccades are defined by a series of metrical and kinematic (evolution of a movement as a function of time) relationships. For example, the amplitude of a saccade made from one visual target to another is roughly 90% of the distance between the(More)
Cecala AL. Using a classic paper by Bell as a platform for discussing the role of corollary discharge-like signals in sensory perception and movement control. of behavioral observations have shown that invertebrate and vertebrate species have the ability to distinguish between self-generated afferent inputs versus those that are generated externally. In the(More)
The ability to acquire, observe, and analyze neuronal activity in conjunction with behavior in awake, behaving organisms was a great leap forward for the field of neuroscience in the 20th century. While some of the early experiments are relayed in introductory textbooks, rarely are undergraduate students introduced to tractable primary literature that(More)