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Arthropod relationships revealed by phylogenomic analysis of nuclear protein-coding sequences
TLDR
This work presents strongly supported results from likelihood, Bayesian and parsimony analyses of over 41 kilobases of aligned DNA sequence from 62 single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from 75 arthropod species, providing a statistically well-supported phylogenetic framework for the largest animal phylum.
Toward reconstructing the evolution of advanced moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia): an initial molecular study
TLDR
The results corroborate the broad outlines of the current working phylogenetic hypothesis for Ditrysia, demonstrate that some prominent features of that hypothesis, including the position of the butterflies, need revision, and resolve the majority of family and subfamily relationships within superfamilies as thus far sampled.
Resolving arthropod phylogeny: exploring phylogenetic signal within 41 kb of protein-coding nuclear gene sequence.
TLDR
This study attempts to resolve relationships among and within the four basal arthropod lineages and to assess the widespread expectation that remaining phylogenetic problems will yield to increasing amounts of sequence data.
Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera is considerably older than previously hypothesized, and it is shown that multiple lineages of moths independently evolved hearing organs well before the origin of bats, rejecting the hypothesis that lepidopteran hearing organs arose in response to these predators.
A Large-Scale, Higher-Level, Molecular Phylogenetic Study of the Insect Order Lepidoptera (Moths and Butterflies)
TLDR
This study highlights the challenge of finding optimal topologies when analyzing hundreds of taxa and shows that some nodes get strong support only when analysis is restricted to nonsynonymous change, while total change is necessary for strong support of others.
Resolving Discrepancy between Nucleotides and Amino Acids in Deep-Level Arthropod Phylogenomics: Differentiating Serine Codons in 21-Amino-Acid Models
TLDR
It is demonstrated for degeneracy coding that neither compositional heterogeneity at the level of nucleotides nor codon usage bias between Ser1 and Ser2 clusters of codons (or their separately coded amino acids) is a major source of non-phylogenetic signal.
Can Deliberately Incomplete Gene Sample Augmentation Improve a Phylogeny Estimate for the Advanced Moths and Butterflies (Hexapoda: Lepidoptera)?
TLDR
This node (Gelechioidea + Apoditrysia), tentatively proposed by previous authors on the basis of four morphological synapomorphies, is the first major subset of ditrysian superfamilies to receive strong statistical support in any phylogenetic study.
Increased gene sampling yields robust support for higher‐level clades within Bombycoidea (Lepidoptera)
TLDR
Based on the robustly resolved results, the classification of Bombycoidea is revised: the family Bombycidae is restricted to its nominate subfamily, and its tribe Epiini is elevated to subfamily rank (Epiinae stat.rev.), whereas the bombycid subfamily Phiditiinae is reinstated as a separate family.
A molecular phylogeny and revised classification for the oldest ditrysian moth lineages (Lepidoptera: Tineoidea), with implications for ancestral feeding habits of the mega‐diverse Ditrysia
TLDR
The largest tineoid molecular study to date, sampling five to 19 nuclear gene regions in 62 species, and suggests that the earliest ditrysians may typically have been detritivores and/or fungivores as larvae, like most extant tineoids, rather than host‐specific feeders.
Order Lepidoptera Linnaeus, 1758. In : Zhang, Z.-Q. (Ed.) Animal biodiversity: An outline of higher-level classification and survey of taxonomic richness
TLDR
This dissertation aims to provide a history of web exceptionalism from 1989 to 2002, a period chosen in order to explore its roots as well as specific cases up to and including the year in which descriptions of “Web 2.0” began to circulate.
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