• Publications
  • Influence
Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations with exposure to carcinogens and endocrine disruptors: a Canadian case–control study
BackgroundEndocrine disrupting chemicals and carcinogens, some of which may not yet have been classified as such, are present in many occupational environments and could increase breast cancer risk.Expand
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The Case for a Global Ban on Asbestos
BACKGROUND All forms of asbestos are now banned in 52 countries. Safer products have replaced many materials that once were made with it. Nonetheless, many countries still use, import, and exportExpand
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Occupation and Breast Cancer
Abstract:  A local collaborative process was launched in Windsor, Ontario, Canada to explore the role of occupation as a risk factor for cancer. An initial hypothesis‐generating study found anExpand
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Prevalence of skin problems and leg ulceration in a sample of young injecting drug users
BackgroundDrug users suffer harm from the injecting process, and clinical services are reporting increasing numbers presenting with skin-related problems such as abscesses and leg ulcers. SkinExpand
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Occupational Histories of Cancer Patients in a Canadian Cancer Treatment Center and the Generated Hypothesis Regarding Breast Cancer and Farming
Abstract Occupational exposures increase cancer risks. The Windsor Regional Cancer Centre in Windsor, Ontario, was the first Canadian cancer treatment center to collect the work histories of itsExpand
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Chemical Exposures of Women Workers in the Plastics Industry with Particular Reference to Breast Cancer and Reproductive Hazards
Despite concern about the harmful effects of substances contained in various plastic consumer products, little attention has focused on the more heavily exposed women working in the plasticsExpand
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Integrating environmental health into nursing and midwifery practice.
AIM With the recognition that environmental health has relevance to all nursing and midwifery activities, the aim of this paper is to discuss nurses' and midwives' past and present involvement inExpand
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Global Construction Health and Safety—What Works, What Does Not, and Why?
  • A. Watterson
  • Business, Medicine
  • International journal of occupational and…
  • 1 January 2007
Abstract The marginalization of construction workers makes them especially vulnerable in terms of poor occu pational health and safety standards and lax enforcement, with resulting disabilities. AExpand
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Pesticide Health and Safety and the Work and Impact of International Agencies: Partial Successes and Major Failures
  • A. Watterson
  • Business, Medicine
  • International journal of occupational and…
  • 1 October 2001
Abstract The paper explores aspects of the international role and impact of key agencies in informing regulators and users about pesticides and controlling and preventing pesticide poisoningExpand
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Regulation of Occupational Health and Safety in the Semiconductor Industry: Enforcement Problems and Solutions
  • A. Watterson
  • Business, Medicine
  • International journal of occupational and…
  • 1 January 2006
Abstract Reports of high incidences of occupational illnesses in the semiconductor industry should have triggered global investigations and rigorous inspection of the industry. Yet semiconductorExpand
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