• Publications
  • Influence
Echolocation behavior of big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, in the field and the laboratory.
  • A. Surlykke, C. Moss
  • Physics, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 14 November 2000
Echolocation signals were recorded from big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, flying in the field and the laboratory. In open field areas the interpulse intervals (IPI) of search signals were eitherExpand
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Echolocating Bats Cry Out Loud to Detect Their Prey
Echolocating bats have successfully exploited a broad range of habitats and prey. Much research has demonstrated how time-frequency structure of echolocation calls of different species is adapted toExpand
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Active Listening for Spatial Orientation in a Complex Auditory Scene
To successfully negotiate a complex environment, an animal must control the timing of motor behaviors in coordination with dynamic sensory information. Here, we report on adaptive temporal control ofExpand
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How Some Insects Detect and Avoid Being Eaten by Bats: Tactics and Countertactics of Prey and Predator
S insects have evolved audition and evasive behaviors in response to selective pressure from bats, and other insects were preadapted to detecting ultrasonic signals. Some bats have evolved in turn,Expand
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Acoustic scanning of natural scenes by echolocation in the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus
SUMMARY Echolocation allows bats to orient and localize prey in complete darkness. The sonar beam of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is directional but broad enough to provide audible echoExpand
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Echolocating bats emit a highly directional sonar sound beam in the field
Bats use echolocation or biosonar to navigate and find prey at night. They emit short ultrasonic calls and listen for reflected echoes. The beam width of the calls is central to the function of theExpand
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Auditory scene analysis by echolocation in bats.
  • C. Moss, A. Surlykke
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 2 October 2001
TLDR
Echolocating bats transmit ultrasonic vocalizations and use information contained in the reflected sounds to analyze the auditory scene. Expand
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Sperm whale clicks: directionality and source level revisited.
In sperm whales (Physeter catodon L. 1758) the nose is vastly hypertrophied, accounting for about one-third of the length or weight of an adult male. Norris and Harvey [in Animal Orientation andExpand
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Vespertilionid bats control the width of their biosonar sound beam dynamically during prey pursuit
Animals using sound for communication emit directional signals, focusing most acoustic energy in one direction. Echolocating bats are listening for soft echoes from insects. Therefore, a directionalExpand
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