• Publications
  • Influence
How to share a secret
  • A. Shamir
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
    CACM
  • 1 November 1979
TLDR
This technique enables the construction of robust key management schemes for cryptographic systems that can function securely and reliably even when misfortunes destroy half the pieces and security breaches expose all but one of the remaining pieces.
A method for obtaining digital signatures and public-key cryptosystems
TLDR
An encryption method is presented with the novel property that publicly revealing an encryption key does not thereby reveal the corresponding decryption key, soriers or other secure means are not needed to transmit keys.
A method for obtaining digital signatures and public-key cryptosystems
An encryption method is presented with the novel property that publicly revealing an encryption key does not thereby reveal the corresponding decryption key. This has two important
Identity-Based Cryptosystems and Signature Schemes
  • A. Shamir
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
    CRYPTO
  • 19 August 1984
TLDR
A novel type of cryptographic scheme, which enables any pair of users to communicate securely and to verify each other’s signatures without exchanging private or public keys, without keeping key directories, and without using the services of a third party.
Visual Cryptography
TLDR
A new type of cryptographic scheme, which can decode concealed images without any cryptographic computations, is considered, which is perfectly secure and very easy to implement.
Cache Attacks and Countermeasures: The Case of AES
TLDR
An extremely strong type of attack is demonstrated, which requires knowledge of neither the specific plaintexts nor ciphertexts, and works by merely monitoring the effect of the cryptographic process on the cache.
How to Prove Yourself: Practical Solutions to Identification and Signature Problems
TLDR
Simple identification and signature schemes which enable any user to prove his identity and the authenticity of his messages to any other user without shared or public keys are described.
Differential cryptanalysis of DES-like cryptosystems
The Data Encryption Standard (DES) is the best known and most widely used cryptosystem for civilian applications. It was developed at IBM and adopted by the National Bureau of Standards in the mid
Differential Fault Analysis of Secret Key Cryptosystems
TLDR
This work states that this attack is applicable only to public key cryptosystems such as RSA, and not to secret key algorithms such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES).
How to Leak a Secret
TLDR
A new construction of ring signatures is proposed, which is unconditionally signer-ambiguous, provably secure in the random oracle model, and exceptionally efficient: adding each ring member increases the cost of signing or verifying by a single modular multiplication and a single symmetric encryption.
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