• Publications
  • Influence
Decline in invasive pneumococcal disease after the introduction of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.
BACKGROUND In early 2000, a protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine targeting seven pneumococcal serotypes was licensed in the United States for use in young children. METHODS We examinedExpand
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Group B streptococcal disease in the era of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis.
BACKGROUND Group B streptococcal infections are a leading cause of neonatal mortality, and they also affect pregnant women and the elderly. Many cases of the disease in newborns can be prevented byExpand
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Epidemiology of human listeriosis.
During the 1980s, investigation of several large epidemics of listeriosis confirmed that transmission of L. monocytogenes in food causes human disease. Progress in laboratory detection and subtypingExpand
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Epidemiology of invasive group B streptococcal disease in the United States, 1999-2005.
CONTEXT Group B streptococcus is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in newborns and causes substantial disease in elderly individuals. Guidelines for prevention of perinatal disease throughExpand
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Epidemiology of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in the United States, 1995-1998: Opportunities for prevention in the conjugate vaccine era.
CONTEXT Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is recommended for elderly persons and adults with certain chronic illnesses. Additionally, a recently licensed pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine hasExpand
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Bacterial meningitis in the United States, 1998-2007.
BACKGROUND The rate of bacterial meningitis declined by 55% in the United States in the early 1990s, when the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine for infants was introduced. MoreExpand
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Epidemiology of Group B Streptococcal Disease in the United States: Shifting Paradigms
  • A. Schuchat
  • Medicine
  • Clinical Microbiology Reviews
  • 1 July 1998
SUMMARY Since its emergence 25 years ago, group B streptococcus has become recognized as a cause of serious illness in newborns, pregnant women, and adults with chronic medical conditions. HeavyExpand
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Epidemiology of human listeriosis.
During the 1980s, investigation of several large epidemics of listeriosis confirmed that transmission of L. monocytogenes in food causes human disease. Progress in laboratory detection and subtypingExpand
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The changing epidemiology of meningococcal disease in the United States, 1992-1996.
New meningococcal vaccines are undergoing clinical trials, and changes in the epidemiologic features of meningococcal disease will affect their use. Active laboratory-based, population-based USExpand
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A population-based comparison of strategies to prevent early-onset group B streptococcal disease in neonates.
BACKGROUND Guidelines issued in 1996 in the United States recommend either screening of pregnant women for group B streptococcal colonization by means of cultures (screening approach) or assessingExpand
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