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Microbial biogeography: putting microorganisms on the map
TLDR
Current evidence confirms that, as proposed by the Baas-Becking hypothesis, 'the environment selects' and is, in part, responsible for spatial variation in microbial diversity, but recent studies also dispute the idea that 'everything is everywhere'.
Population Structure and Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Deep-Sea Sediments
TLDR
Investigation of deep-sea sediments collected from several stations in the Atlantic Ocean revealed the presence of a complex archaeal population structure, whose members could be grouped into discrete phylogenetic lineages within the two kingdoms, Crenarchaeota and EuryarchAEota.
Novel Bacterial and Archaeal Lineages from an In Situ Growth Chamber Deployed at a Mid-Atlantic Ridge Hydrothermal Vent
TLDR
The phylogenetic diversity was determined for a microbial community obtained from an in situ growth chamber placed on a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the prevalence of clones related to thermophilic microbes that use hydrogen as an electron donor and sulfur compounds indicates the importance of hydrogen oxidation and sulfur metabolism at deep- sea hydroThermal vents.
Persephonella marina gen. nov., sp. nov. and Persephonella guaymasensis sp. nov., two novel, thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing microaerophiles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.
TLDR
Maximum-likelihood analysis of the 16S rRNA phylogeny placed both isolates within the Aquificales as a distinct lineage and showed them to be only about 85% similar to Aquifex pyrophilus, and it is proposed thatEX-H1T and EX-H2T belong to a new genus within the aquifer, namely Persephonella gen. nov.
Deep-sea vent ε-proteobacterial genomes provide insights into emergence of pathogens
TLDR
Comparison of genomes of two deep-sea vent ε-Proteobacteria strains suggests that there are previously unrecognized evolutionary links between important human/animal pathogens and their nonpathogenic, symbiotic, chemolithoautotrophicDeep-sea relatives.
Biogeography and Ecological Setting of Indian Ocean Hydrothermal Vents
TLDR
Most organisms found at these Indian Ocean vent fields have evolutionary affinities with western Pacific vent faunas, but a shrimp that ecologically dominates Indian Ocean vents closely resembles its Mid-Atlantic counterpart.
Differential amplification of rRNA genes by polymerase chain reaction
TLDR
This work has found that the addition of 5% (wt/vol) acetamide to a PCR mixture containing both archaebacterial and yeast DNA templates minimized nonspecific annealing of the primers and prevented preferential amplification of the yeast small-subunit rRNA genes.
A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents
TLDR
The isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group is reported, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75 °C, providing evidence that thermo Acidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents.
Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.
TLDR
Results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum.
Geoglobus ahangari gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic archaeon capable of oxidizing organic acids and growing autotrophically on hydrogen with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron
TLDR
This isolate is the first example of a hyperthermophile capable of oxidizing long-chain fatty acids anaerobically and is proposed to represent a novel genus within the Archaeoglobales.
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